Insights

Loss in Liminal Space

Liminality is the antidote to superficiality - the curse of this age. Liminal space invites us to embrace suffering not escape it.

Liminality is the antidote to superficiality - the curse of this age. Liminal space invites us to embrace suffering not escape it. There is no depth without suffering…

Liminal space is often precipitated by and marked by loss, both great and small. We should not compare but we are invited to mourn our loss and mourn with those who mourn theirs. As we do something amazing can happen. Tears of sadness become seeds of gratitude and the fruit of gratitude is hope and joy.

Henri Nouwen believed that sorrow and joy are part of the same movement and that the steps of our dancing are ordered through our mourning. He suggested we are not able to be truly glad unless we are also able to be truly sad. My journey tells me he was right. For so many of us the past year has been a time of great loss, a time when we’ve experienced deep sorrow and sadness but at the same time liminal space has invited us to be grateful and in so doing to release joy, it continues to invite us to embrace loss and at the same time hold on to hope, it invites us to practice mourning and at the same time to learn the steps to a new dance.

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